Around the Blogosphere—4/29/2012

The big issue in our group was the re-write of the trial process for clergy. The process for Bishops and laity remains the same. They took out the committee on investigation. Now, it all goes to the attorney for the church who investigates and determines, in consultation with the Bishop whether or not to proceed. A very simple idea, but a very complicated process that took a group of 6 delegates all of 3 days to sort through it.

Read more from Mark Holland at Urban Ecclessiology
http://urbanecclesiology.me/2012/04/28/week-one-complete-10/

I have never seen such a wired meeting before in my life. It makes me wonder why we are all sitting in the same room, when we could just as easily be connected electronically for all this administrative work. While we are physically present in the room, most of the delegates are connected to someone else somewhere else in the world. In plenary, at least a third of the delegates are tweeting/texting/instant messaging at any one time. We might as well change the logos from GC to 4GC.

Read more from Dan Dick at United Methodeviations
http://doroteos2.wordpress.com/2012/04/29/wheelie-bags-on-parade/

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