“All Means All”

“Once we are in, it is our job to invite others,” Bishop King said at the evening worship on Wednesday, April 25. Thus he challenged the General Conference and created a courageous space for us.

Who are OTHERS that we invite in? ALL. All means All, Bishop King said.

I see people welcoming those who are just like them. But Jesus’ challenges us to welcome those we do not know yet and those who may be quite different from ourselves. When we do that, we live out the love of God. Living out the love of God is the faithful gateway to ministry with ALL and to relevant, thriving United Methodist congregations in all our neighborhoods

Bishop King spoke the word “INVITE” in several different languages. He pronounced “invite” in Korean pretty well – “Cho-chung-ham-nee-da.” So, I gather he did well with other languages as well. Good for him!

I felt his attempt to say INVITE in different languages as an expression of our deep commitment to be an inclusive, multicultural and multi-lingual church. I envision a church that embraces all God’s children and knows no boundaries. This is a church where the Spirit of the living God continues to create a community out of the diversity of humankind. The future of the United Methodist Church will be alive and vital when the church genuinely responds to our multi-cultural reality.

All means All.


Like what you're reading? Support the ministry of UM News! Your support ensures the latest denominational news, dynamic stories and informative articles will continue to connect our global community. Make a tax-deductible donation at ResourceUMC.org/GiveUMCom.

Sign up for our newsletter!

UMNEWS-SUBSCRIPTION
Theology and Education
Dr. David W. Scott. Photo © Hector Amador.

Autonomy, international division mark United Methodist tradition

The recent move by United Methodists in Bulgaria and Romania to leave the denomination is the latest in a history of separations within the Methodist tradition.
Social Concerns
Susan Kim. Photo courtesy of the author.

Where do Korean Americans stand?

Asian Americans often confront implicit bias in questions like “Where are you really from?” Susan Sungsil Kim has crafted responses to such questions that stand up for her rights while also providing an educational opportunity to those who ask.
Social Concerns
Kendra Weddle. Photo courtesy of the author.

Let’s love our neighbors

Growing up in a traditionalist church but now on staff at a reconciling congregation, Kendra Weddle feels there is room at the table for everyone.