2011 Change the World event aims to mobilize half a million volunteers

United Methodist Communications
Office of Public Information
www.umcpresscenter.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 9,2010

Nashville, Tenn. The second annual church-wide Change the World event, planned for May 14-15, 2011, is a call for United Methodists to make a positive difference locally and globally.

Modeling last year's success when 100,000 people from over 1,000 churches rolled up their sleeves to feed the hungry, aid the homeless, visit the lonely, get involved in a cause and more, organizers expect 2011's Change the World activities to feature at least 3,500 events that will mobilize a half a million volunteers.

"The phenomenal participation in last year's Change the World tells us that people are hungry to make a difference," said the Rev. Larry Hollon, chief executive of United Methodist Communications. "In ways big and small, United Methodists actively show love by serving others-especially the poor and the marginalized. The combined capacity of so many churches working together to make a life-changing difference on one weekend is a powerful concept."

During the May weekend, United Methodist churches are encouraged to create and participate in a service or fundraising event that helps bring about positive change, whether it's cleaning up school grounds, renovating homes or getting involved in global health issues like malaria. Churches can take advantage of existing ministries or initiate a new outreach event.

The Change the World event was originally created as part of the Rethink Church campaign by United Methodist Communications in partnership with the United Methodist Publishing House, based on a concept originated by the Rev. Mike Slaughter, who authored a book by the same name. Rethink Church seeks to utilize outreach events that embrace the concept of outbound church to make a positive difference in the world beyond the church doors.

For more information about Change the World, or to learn how you can create an event for your church, go to umcom.org/changetheworld.

Media contact:
Diane Degnan
ddegnan@umcom.org
615-742-5406 (w)
615-483-1765 (c)

Latest News

Evangelism
Orphan children receive a goat as part of a project in Mahenye, Zimbabwe. The recipients must return the first female progeny from their goat to the project, which is then given to a new orphan. The program is one of many self-help projects for disadvantaged communities in Zimbabwe funded by three Florida United Methodist churches. Photo by Chenayi Kumuterera, UMNS.

In Zimbabwe, self-help projects spark evangelism

New United Methodist congregation in Mahenya community works with Florida churches to improve livelihoods.
Social Concerns
Ron Blanton plays the Rev. Charles Moore in a re-enactment segment of the new documentary “Man on Fire.” Moore, a retired United Methodist elder, set himself on fire in a suicidal protest of racism in 2014. Film image courtesy of “Man on Fire” film.

PBS film looks at pastor's fatal protest

The 2014 self-immolation of retired United Methodist clergyman Charles Moore, and its effect on his East Texas hometown, is the subject of "Man on Fire."
General Conference
Patricia L. Miller is executive director of the United Methodist Confessing Movement and also served on the Commission on a Way Forward. She submitted the legislation for the Connectional Conference Plan to General Conference. Miller spoke with UM News as part of “Seeing a Way Forward,” a video series featuring different perspectives of church leaders on the work of the Commission on a Way Forward.

Seeing a Way Forward: Patricia L. Miller

Patricia L. Miller submitted the legislation for the Connectional Conference Plan to General Conference. She explains why it’s meant to provide the “most space between theological differences” while maintaining unity.

Sign up for our newsletter!

SUBSCRIBE