You Are Not Alone: Responding to immigrant children’s needs

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Mission and Ministry
Asylum-seekers from Lebanon are greeted by Federica Brizi and Francesco Piobbichi of the Federation of Evangelical Churches in Italy (center) upon their arrival in Rome in August 2017. The group obtained legal visas through the Humanitarian Corridors program of the federation, the Synod of Waldensian and Methodist Churches and the Community of Sant’Egidio, run by Mediterranean Hope. Photo courtesy of Mediterranean Hope.

Small churches play big role for refugees in Italy

Italian religious groups, including Methodists, have created a legal, safe pathway for Syrians and other vulnerable asylum seekers to resettle in Italy and the work is expanding.
Social Concerns
United Methodist deaconess Cindy Johnson (right) walks to buy medicine with Isabél who traveled with her daughter from Nicaragua to Matamoros, Mexico, hoping to request asylum in the U.S. Kassandra, 16 months, was suffering from fever and weight loss while she and her mother waited for their turn to approach the bridge leading to Brownsville, Texas. Johnson, who makes regular visits to the makeshift camp, brought members of the United Methodist Immigration Task Force for a firsthand look at the immigration situation. Photo by Mike DuBose, UMNS.

United Methodists respond to migrants at the border

The United Methodist Immigration Task Force saw United Methodists in action caring for migrants from around the world seeking asylum at border towns in Texas.
Social Concerns
A cattle dip tank in the village of Nyamacheni, built with funding from Norwegian United Methodists, is saving cattle in Gokwe, Zimbabwe. A dip tank is a plunge bath designed to immerse livestock in water with pesticides in order to kill ticks. Photo by Everisto Gumbo.

Cattle dip tank revitalizes village

Funded by the Chabadza partnership between The United Methodist Church in Norway and Zimbabwe, the dip tank has brought hope to villagers whose cattle were previously wiped out by tick-borne diseases.