‘Night Call’ spurred conversations on race in 1960s

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Social Concerns
The Rev. Gilbert Caldwell, a retired United Methodist pastor and civil rights activist who marched alongside the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., speaks during a Black Lives Matter rally June 7 in Willingboro, N.J. To Caldwell’s right is his wife, Grace Caldwell. To Caldwell’s left is the Rev. Vanessa Wilson, chairperson of the Greater New Jersey Commission on Race and Religion and pastor of Good Shepherd United Methodist Church in Willingboro. The protest was one of many taking place in the U.S. in smaller cities and towns involving United Methodists. Photo by Aaron Wilson Watson.

Smaller communities affected by protests

United Methodists have been involved in Black Lives Matter rallies in small towns and midsize cities.
The Rev. Byron Thomas. Photo courtesy of Ben Hill United Methodist Church

Black father prepares sons for racial injustice

“I have no positive to give you,” one son says. In a commentary, the Rev. Byron Thomas calls on white fathers to teach their sons about racial injustice, too.
Social Concerns
A stained-glass window in The Cathedral of the Rockies/Boise First United Methodist Church, in Boise, Idaho, features images of Robert E. Lee (left), Abraham Lincoln and George Washington. Church leaders have decided to remove the image of Lee, given his role as a Confederate general. “Symbols of white supremacy do not belong in our sacred space,” they said in a statement. Photo courtesy of The Cathedral of the Rockies.

Robert E. Lee image out at Boise church

Cathedral of the Rockies, also known as Boise First United Methodist Church, will remove the Confederate general from its stained glass.