A Native American Celebration of Holy Communion


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Mission and Ministry
Wampanoag leader Ousamequin (left) and Plymouth Colony Gov. John Carver are depicted smoking a peace pipe as they worked out a treaty of peace and mutual protection on March 22, 1621. The U.S. Thanksgiving Day tradition has mythologized the relationship between the Wampanoag and the English settlers, but the harsher realities provide vital lessons for United Methodists today. Image from the California State Library’s Sutro Library, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

The making of Thanksgiving in the US

With this year marking the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ arrival in North America, it’s worth revisiting the good — and the bad — of how the U.S. holiday developed.
Social Concerns
Tink Tinker (wazhazhe, Osage Nation) helps lead an "Act of Repentance toward Healing Relationships with Indigenous Peoples" at the 2012 United Methodist General Conference in Tampa, Fla. Tinker is professor emeritus at The Iliff School of Theology. File photo by Mike DuBose, UM News.

Facing up to a grotesque book at Iliff

A book with a cover made from the skin of a slain Native American has haunted United Methodist Iliff School of Theology for decades, but its president wants it used as a teachable moment instead of buried in a library vault.
Social Concerns
In this file photo, the Rev. Homer Noley, a United Methodist from Wilburton, Okla., joins other members of his denomination in protesting outside a May 11, 2000, Cleveland Indians baseball game held during The United Methodist General Conference. Rev. Noley died in 2018. Photo by Paul Jeffrey, UM News.

NFL team name change victory for Native people

Washington NFL team dropping the name Redskins marks beginning of era of understanding the negative impact the names have for Native people, United Methodists said.